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Can’t say “I’m sorry” or “Thank you”

Brene’s research shows that vulnerability is a key to happy and fulfilling life. IreneCarr.com

I have been pondering the times in my own life when I have had a hard time or couldn’t get myself to say “I’m sorry” or “Thank you.”

Why? There would be a part of me that felt sorry or thankful, yet there was another aspect of myself that was in no way willing to allow the words to escape my mouth.

So what the heck is going on here???

I really started to ponder this. As I have learned whenever I ponder a question without getting fixated on needing to have the answer, the answer show up in a multitude of different ways. So it percolated in me for awhile.

Vulnerability

The answer to this question came with a internal realization that both of those phrases are opening me up, allowing me to be vulnerable, and require me to let go of control. Hmm… vulnerability. I referenced the queen of vulnerability research, Brene Brown, to see what she had to say about all this.

Yahoo, to being able to say “I am sorry” and “Thank you!”

Brene’s list of vulnerable acts did saying “I am sorry” and “Thank you.” Her list also included the ability to ask for help, admitting “I don’t know,” asking for what I need, and many other sticky phrases. Sometimes with some people these phrases come easy, while others there is no way in hell those words are coming out of my mouth.

Live in the place of openness to all of life

Brene’s research shows that vulnerability is a key to happy and fulfilling life. Her research demonstrates that we either live being invulnerable or vulnerable, but there is no middle ground. Furthermore Brene found that those of us who live vulnerably are happier, more fulfilled and peaceful regardless of our external circumstances. This is strong evidence to live in the place of openness to all of life.

Yahoo, to being able to say “I am sorry” and “Thank you!”

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